Stephen F. Austin High School (2010)

Stephen F. Austin High School (2010)

Stephen F. Austin High School (2010)

Stephen F. Austin High School (2010)

Stephen F. Austin High School (1925-1975)

Stephen F. Austin High School (1925-1975)

Carved ribbon banner in walnut by Mansbendel carved 1930

Carved ribbon banner in walnut by Mansbendel carved 1930

Banner detail

Banner detail

SF Austin Portrait plaque

SF Austin Portrait plaque

SF Austin Portrait plaque detail in pine-circa 1939

SF Austin Portrait plaque detail in pine-circa 1939

Example Frame

Austin High School

Areas of Significance: Art, Architecture
City: Austin

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN HIGH SCHOOL IN AUSTIN
Stephen F. Austin High School has a history of more than eleven decades. Three buildings, magnificent for their times, have housed the school. The first campus was built in 1900 as the "finest public high school in the South." This building, at 9th and Trinity Street, served for fifty-six years as a city school. During the period 1900-1925 it was "old red", named for the dark red bricks. The building burned in a spectacular fire in 1956. In 1925, John Allan Junior High was moved to the 9th and Trinity location from 1212 Rio Grande. Austin High School moved to the Rio Grande location. In 1975, after fifty years at the Rio Grande campus, the present Lakeside Campus was built. 

In 1912, the Austin School board hired Miss Alice Harrison as the only Librian in the district until the 1920's. She reguarly took books and put them in her Model "T" Ford. She took them to Junior high and elementary schools on a regular basis. This could be said to be Austin's first "Book Mobile". 

Miss Harrison was a Librarian of the old school. You were expected to take care of your library business. You did not talk, chew gum, drink brevages or snack. You put your chair under the table when you were ready to leave, you always had a permit signed by your teacher. She was a strict protector of her precious books. A student who did not return checked out library books paid a few pennies a day. 

By 1930, Miss Harrison accumulated several hundred dollars in "fines" and commissioned Peter Mansbendel to carve a "Library" wall piece. Magnificently carved in Black Walnut, the sign still hangs, today, in the library at the Lakeside campus.
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