Front elevation

Front elevation

Rear elevation

Rear elevation

First home swimming pool in Navarro county

First home swimming pool in Navarro county

Crane newel post carved and signed by Mansbendel

Crane newel post carved and signed by Mansbendel

Living room fireplace mantle-Cast stone work attributed to PM

Living room fireplace mantle-Cast stone work attributed to PM

Den mantle carved in oak with acanthus motif attributed to PM

Den mantle carved in oak with acanthus motif attributed to PM

Door header in oak-attributed to PM

Door header in oak-attributed to PM

Crane inspired stained glass attributed to Potter-similar to Perry home

Crane inspired stained glass attributed to Potter-similar to Perry home

cactus motif stained glass-art deco-attributed to Potter

cactus motif stained glass-art deco-attributed to Potter

Example Frame

William and Besse Stroube (Corsicana, TX)

Architect/Builder: David R Williams
Year: 1927
Style: Spanish Colonial Revival
Areas of Significance: Architecture, Art
City: Corsicana

WILLIAM AND BESSIE STROUBE HOUSE
Local Corsicana oil operator William C. Stroube and his wife Bessie commissioned this 2-story Spanish Colonial Revival house, designed by renown Dallas architect David R. Williams in 1927. Its stylistic features include exterior walls of stone and stucco, a tripped roof with clay tiles, and a cantilevered balcony over the primary entrance that reflect Williams' interest in vernacular architectural traditions. As the leading proponent of the regionalist movement among Texas architects during the late 1920s and 1930s, Williams espoused incorporation of 'indigenous' Texas architectural forms into new domestic designs. For his first commission in Corsicana, he incorporated stone salvaged from an early house in Palo Pinto County and columns from an old post office in Dallas (McCarthy 1984: 78). The house also incorporated wood carvings by noted artisan Peter Mansbendel of Austin. Contemporaneous outbuildings including a free standing porte cochere and a 1-story garage and servants quarters create an informal spaces reminiscent of Mexican architecture, a hallmark of Williams' regionalist work. In the span of the next four years, Williams twice returned to the neighborhood, designing houses in this aesthetic for Francis and Katherine Mickey (613 Mills Place Drive; 1929) and Lowry and Lila Martin (1218 West Park Avenue; 1931).
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