Over mantle carved by Mansbendel patterned after Grinling Gibbons

Over mantle carved by Mansbendel patterned after Grinling Gibbons

Front elevation

Front elevation

Example Frame

Nathan Adams

Architect/Builder: Chan Montgomery?
Year: 1929
Style: Italianate
Areas of Significance: Art, Historical
City: Dallas

The Nathan Adams House
The Nathan Adams house located near the Dallas Country Club contained several impressive Mansbendel carvings until they were removed during renovations in the 1970's according to the current owner. Below you will see a portfolio photo of a mantle frieze believed to have been installed in the Adams home.The home also according to records contained, carved cornices and newel post.

ADAMS, NATHAN (1869-1966). Nathan Adams, banker and civic leader, was born on November 26, 1869, near Pulaski, Tennessee, the youngest of seven children of Nathan and Susan (Pankey) Adams. His father, a major in the Confederate Army and a lawyer, died when Adams was five years old, and afterward Mrs. Adams taught at Giles College to support her family. Adams attended public schools in Pulaski, but a foot injury caused him to quit Giles College after a year, and the financial needs of his family prevented his return. He began his business career as cash boy in a general store and later became a runner for the People's National Bank of Pulaski, manager of a bookstore, and bookkeeper for both the Giles National Bank and a grocery store.

When Adams adeptly prepared a statement for a family friend, who was also treasurer of the Texas and Pacific Railway, the friend invited him to come to Dallas. In December 1887 Adams borrowed seventy-five dollars to make the trip and soon thereafter began work as an agent in the auditing department of the railroad. By the next year, however, he had returned to banking as a utility and relief man at the National Exchange Bank. During a series of mergers he rose swiftly through the ranks. He became the president of the First National Bank of Dallas, the largest bank in the South, in 1929. In 1944 he became chairman of the board. He retired in 1950 at the age of eighty as honorary board chairman.

Adams married Elizabeth Kirtley Ardinger on November 4, 1891; they had one daughter. He was a member of the Episcopal Church. Although a conservative Democrat, he opposed prohibition. He lived at the Scottish Rite Hospital in failing health for the last four years of his life and died there on June 17, 1966.
Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy  | © 2012 Texas Woodcarver. All rights reserved. | PO Box 270120 | Flower Mound, TX 75027-0120 | Ph 972.874.3677