Front elevation of home

Front elevation of home

Home name plate...

Home name plate..."Hearts lifted";

Ney portrait in oil

Ney portrait in oil

Historical photo of Ney at work in her studio ( circa 1900)

Historical photo of Ney at work in her studio ( circa 1900)

Portrait of Ney in Texas Capitol Building-2nd floor

Portrait of Ney in Texas Capitol Building-2nd floor

Stephen F. Austin statue at Texas Capitol

Stephen F. Austin statue at Texas Capitol

Sam Houston Bust

Sam Houston Bust

Texas historical figures in bust form by Ney

Texas historical figures in bust form by Ney

Carved gavel in walnut of Alamo by PM presented to Ney museum

Carved gavel in walnut of Alamo by PM presented to Ney museum

Relief carving of Ney home by PM (~1930) in mahogany

Relief carving of Ney home by PM (~1930) in mahogany

Example Frame

Elizabet Ney

Architect/Builder: Edmund & Elizabet Ney
Year: 1894
Style: Neoclassical
Areas of Significance: art
City: Austin

 Franzisca Bernadina Wilhelmina Elizabet Ney (January 26, 1833–June 29, 1907) was a celebrated German-born sculptor who spent the first half of her life and career in Europe, producing sculpted works of famous leaders such as Otto von Bismarck, Giuseppe Garibaldi and King George V of Hannover. At age 39, she immigrated to Texas with her husband Edmund D. Montgomery Ney was one of the most colorful and influential women in early Texas history. She and her husband Dr. Edmund Montgomery played an active role in the establishment of Texas state universities and the Texas Fine Arts Association, and they continue to this day to be an inspiration to people who love art and ideas. In 1892, Elisabet Ney built a small neoclassical studio in the remote natural setting of Hyde Park, Austin, Texas. In this studio Ney sculpted the “great men” of frontier Texas, among them life-size figures of Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston that stand today in the national and state capitols. By the turn of the century, Elisabet Ney's Hyde Park studio had become a gathering place for influential Texans drawn to the colorful character of “Miss Ney” and to the stimulating discussions of politics, art and philosophy that took place there. Inspired by Ney's “revolutionary” idea that art and beauty have been–and can be–powerful  forces in the shaping of a nation as well as in individuals, these early Texans went on to found the University of Texas Art Department, the Texas Commission on the Arts, the Texas Fine Arts Association and museums and art  schools throughout the state.

 Following Elisabet Ney's death in 1907, her friends preserved the studio and its contents as the Elisabet Ney Museum, dedicated to honoring the memory of Elisabet Ney and to promoting her ideals and visions for the people of Texas.

It is said the Peter Mansbendel was allowed to use Ms. Ney’s studio several times when working on very large projects. Peter produced a gavel and relief of her home to the art society of Texas to honor and her work.

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