West elevation

West elevation

South elevation

South elevation

 Victorian detail

Victorian detail

Victorian detail

Victorian detail

W.H. Stark portrait

W.H. Stark portrait

Miriam Stark historic photo

Miriam Stark historic photo

Lutcher Stark historical photo-~1930

Lutcher Stark historical photo-~1930

Keyhole window detail-longleaf pine paneling

Keyhole window detail-longleaf pine paneling

Newel Post and stairway

Newel Post and stairway

Ceiling ornamentation

Ceiling ornamentation

Longleaf pine

Longleaf pine

Living room mantle

Living room mantle

Parlor fireplace

Parlor fireplace

Parlor fireplace detail

Parlor fireplace detail

Coat rack ornamentation-Greek revival motif

Coat rack ornamentation-Greek revival motif

Stairwell

Stairwell

Mahogany bedroom suite by Mansbendel ~1920

Mahogany bedroom suite by Mansbendel ~1920

Mahogany bedroom suite by Mansbendel ~1920 (Detail)

Mahogany bedroom suite by Mansbendel ~1920 (Detail)

Mahogany bedroom suite by Mansbendel ~1920 (Detail)

Mahogany bedroom suite by Mansbendel ~1920 (Detail)

Wedgewood walnut suite by Mansbendel

Wedgewood walnut suite by Mansbendel

Wedgewood walnut suite by Mansbendel

Wedgewood walnut suite by Mansbendel

Wedgewood walnut suite by Mansbendel

Wedgewood walnut suite by Mansbendel

"Shall I" tipsy monk by Mansbendel in Walnut ~1925 (10"H)

Beam carved with Alamo fight scene in Walnut 1921 by Mansbendel

Beam carved with Alamo fight scene in Walnut 1921 by Mansbendel

Alamo beam detail

Alamo beam detail

Alamo beam detail-signed 1921

Alamo beam detail-signed 1921

Stark portrait from

Stark portrait from "UT Old Main Bldg" newel post by Mansbendel 1935

First Presbyterian Church-Lutcher Memorial Building 2010

First Presbyterian Church-Lutcher Memorial Building 2010

First Presbyterian Church-sactuary with Stained glass windows

First Presbyterian Church-sactuary with Stained glass windows

First Presbyterian Church-stained glass by Lamb co (NYC)

First Presbyterian Church-stained glass by Lamb co (NYC)

First Presbyterian Church-stained glass detail

First Presbyterian Church-stained glass detail

First Presbyterian Church-dome detail

First Presbyterian Church-dome detail

First Presbyterian Church-angels

First Presbyterian Church-angels

First Presbyterian Church-angel

First Presbyterian Church-angel

First Presbyterian Church-wood ornamentation

First Presbyterian Church-wood ornamentation

First Presbyterian Church-ceiling detail

First Presbyterian Church-ceiling detail

Example Frame

W.H. Stark House (Orange, Tx)

Architect/Builder: W.H. Stark and Fred Wiber
Year: 1894
Style: Queen Anne/Victorian
Areas of Significance: Architecture, Art
City: Orange

Completed in 1894, The W.H. Stark House is a perfectly restored 15-room mansion in Orange, Texas, that was inhabited by the W.H. Stark family from 1894-1936. The three-story wood frame structure is constructed of cypress and longleaf yellow pine, a unique choice for the Southeast Texas area.

The Victorian home – with its many gables, galleries and distinctive windowed turret – shows the influences of several architectural styles, most notably the Queen Anne style. The Stark House remained closed from 1936 until 1971, at which time a 10-year interior and exterior restoration process was commenced. In 1981, the House was opened to the public for guided tours. Further renovation was required after minor damage caused by Hurricane Rita in 2005.  Today, the 14,000 square-foot Stark House appears much as it did in the 1920s, filled with antique rugs, original textiles, custom-made Victorian furniture, silver, cut glass and antique porcelain. South of the main house is the original Carriage House, where two floors of collections amassed by the Stark family are displayed.

Henry Jacob Lutcher Stark was born in Orange, Texas, on December 8, 1887, to Miriam Melissa Lutcher Stark and William Henry (“W.H.”) Stark. He had one sister, Frances (Fannie) Ann Stark, who died as a young child. He was the grandson of Henry Jacob Lutcher and his wife, Frances Ann Lutcher. Lutcher Stark attended public school in Orange, Texas, and graduated from the University of Texas in 1910 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. He became active in banking, insurance, manufacturing, real estate and the petroleum industry; however, he was best known for his contributions to the lumber industry through the successful Lutcher & Moore Lumber Company co-founded by his grandfather, Henry Jacob Lutcher. In 1919, Governor William P. Hobby appointed Lutcher Stark to the University of Texas Board of Regents, a position previously held by Lutcher Stark’s father. Lutcher Stark served on the board for a total of 24 years, including 12 years as chairman. Stark has been credited with naming the university’s mascot. In 1936, Stark gave a large portion of his library to UT to be used in the new tower being built then and is still know as the Stark Library.

Lutcher Stark and Peter Mansbendel

Lutcher Stark and Mansbendel most likely met when Lutcher was serving as a Board of Regents at the University of Texas in Austin. Mansbendel carved two bedroom suites for the Stark family. The first was a mahogany carved twin suite with baroque detail which can been seen at the Stark house and the second was a classic walnut suite which featured Wedgwood medallions (both shown above). In addition, Mansbendel carved an Alamo battle high relief scene on a beam similar to the one he executed for Clara Driscol, a "Shall I" tipsy Monk sculpture in walnut similar to Dee Dee Brown's version and he carved a likeness of Lutcher into an old beam from the "Old Main" building at UT that had been presented to Lutcher for his work as a Board of Regents. The Stark foundation has many written correspondence between the two and they appeared to have a close friendship until Peter's death in 1940.

First Presbyterian Church (Lutcher Memorial building)

I've also included a few photos of the First Presbyterian Church (Lutcher Memorial building) in Orange that the Stark family built. Founded in 1878, the First Presbyterian Church initially occupied a frame structure built in 1883 at Market and Polk Street. In 1912 the congregation moved to this church building which Frances Ann (Mrs. Henry Jacob) Lutcher (1841-1924) had erected as a gift from the Lutcher family. H. J. Lutcher (1836-1912) amassed a fortune in the Lutcher & Moore Lumber Company. The Lutchers and their two daughters Carrie (Mrs. E. W.) Brown and Miriam (Mrs. William H.) Stark were philanthropists and community leaders. Mrs. Lutcher asked that the cost of the building never be publicized. She and her descendants set up a permanent endowment to maintain the facility. Fine workmanship and materials appear throughout the structure. The beautiful art glass windows were made by Lamb Studios of New York. For the upper foyer, Mrs. Lutcher chose three prize-winning windows from the 1893 Chicago World's Fair. The marble came from Italy and the granite was shipped by rail from Llano, Texas. The dome is topped by a copper cupola. Decorations on the sanctuary ceiling and walls have gold leaf overlay. The pews and wood paneling in the organ loft are mahogany. Mosaic work adorns the pulpit, marble communion table and baptismal font.

Photos and content used with permission-Stark Foundation ©2008

 




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